Archives For Human-Genome-Editing

The New Bio-Citizen: How the Democratization of Genomics Will Transform Our Lives from Epidemics Management to the Internet of Living Things

The attributes of a new bio-citizen, in an internet of living things, look like this: scientists, patients, congressmen, employees —everyone—will be analyzing the DNA of their own bodies and the living species surrounding them, by running algorithms through their data sets on shared cloud labs. Portable genomic sequencers, the size of a USB and connected to our smartphones, would become an integral part of our most crucial socio-technical systems from agro-food facilities, airports, battlefields, hospitals and our DIY home labs. These DNA-reading sensors would identify the nature, transmission roads and mutations of deadly viruses, engineered bacteria and forgotten lethal pathogens that could be soon freed by the melting permafrost. In their home, individuals would have access to liquid biopsies, blood test that could track their most vital biomarkers and identify, at early stage, the pieces of DNA shredded by a cancer tumor or a viral agent. If millions of citizens were streaming these data to the cloud, citizens would build the most powerful data set for preventive and precision medicine. The genetic identity of any living thing, then, acquires a second life on the internet; it is The Internet of Living Things.

In this beginning of 21st century, are we equipped to manage the complex and uncertain ethical, security and governance entanglements coming from the Internet of Living Things? (READ MORE)

 

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By Eleonore Pauwels

Published in Issues in Science and Technology, Summer 2016,

In A Dangerous Master, Wendell Wallach, a scholar at Yale University’s Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, tells the story of modern society’s struggle to cope with technology’s complexity and uncertainty. In the course of telling this story, Wallach questions the terms of the social contract under which we as a society, predict, weigh, and manage the potential harms and benefits that result from the adoption of emerging technologies. In urgent prose, he argues that we need different epistemic, cultural, and political approaches to adequately assess emerging technologies’ risks and their broader social impacts. Wallach promotes public deliberation as one of these approaches, which provides citizens and experts the opportunity to distinguish the technological hype from the hope, the speculation from reality, and in so doing shape their technological futures.

There is a whiff of science fiction in Wallach’s prose—maybe more fiction than science. He envisions a future where autonomous robots, designer babies, homemade pathogenic organisms, and mindclones confront our hopes, fears, and inner conflicts…

Full Book Review

Review of: A Dangerous Master: How to Keep Technology from Slipping Beyond Our Control, by Wendell Wallach. New York, NY: Basic Books, 2015, 336 pp.van-gogh-and-the-colors-of-the-night-13